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‘June, 2001’

Après l’air pollué, l’argent pollué

Après l’air pollué, l’argent pollué

Publié par The Nation, 18 juin 2001

En février 2001, après la réunion des pays les plus industrialisés, plus connus sous le nom du G7, lorsque Paul O’Neill, secrétaire d’Etat au Trésor (ministre des finances américain), a déclaré qu’une initiative européenne visant à enrayer le blanchissage de l’argent “ ne consiste pas à dicter aux pays quel est le niveau convenable de la taxation ”, il était clair que c’en était fait. Pendant 18 mois environ, les Etats Unis avaient indiqué qu’ils pensaient sérieusement se joindre aux Européens dans leurs modestes efforts pour s’occuper de l’argent illicite blanchi de part le monde.

After Dirty Air, Dirty Money

After Dirty Air, Dirty Money

The Nation, June 18, 2001

When Treasury Secretary Paul O’Neill said after the February meeting of the top industrialized countries, known as the G-7, that a European initiative to clamp down on money laundering “is not about dictating to any country what should be the appropriate level of tax rates,” it was clear that the game was over.

For about eighteen months the United States had signaled that it was serious about joining the Europeans in modest efforts to deal with the tide of illicit money that washes around the world. Now, the Bush Administration was saying that it was backing off the US commitment to reform the offshore banking system. Instead, the “tough on crime” Republicans would stand shoulder to shoulder with the shady characters in Nauru, Aruba, Liechtenstein and elsewhere who offer state-of-the-art financial services for crooks.

Rich Benefit From Offshore Tax Havens

Rich Benefit From Offshore Tax Havens

The Baltimore Sun, June 17, 2001

Money: The wealthy hide a bundle of their dollars in banks that can keep a secret.

The Bush tax cut for the top 1 percent of richest Americans is worth $69 billion, nearly 38 percent of the total. People who protested that are virtually ignoring another Republican policy that “saves” the rich the same amount. Experts estimate that $70 billion in taxes are lost annually because many wealthy Americans hide money in tax havens, but Republicans in Congress and the White House are blocking efforts to stop this tax evasion.