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‘February, 2017’

Sunset Key’s Latitudes is a magical place for lunch in Key West

Sunset Key’s Latitudes is a magical place for lunch in Key West

The best food in Key West is at the Latitudes restaurant on Sunset Key. There is a magical feel to this exceptional place which is on a small island you reach via a 6-minute launch ride from a pier at the north of Key West. It is the showpiece of Sunset Key, a resort with bungalows, pool, tennis courts and quiet inviting beach.

Watch Key West sunset from historic schooner or catamaran

Watch Key West sunset from historic schooner or catamaran

Sunset cruises are special at Key West. Among all the fun things you do, you will remember them most. I generally like the catamarans, as you can walk about them steadily. No lurching from side to side. More about that later.

Sel et Poivre a favorite unpretentious NY East Side French bistro

Sel et Poivre a favorite unpretentious NY East Side French bistro

At this New York French bistro, game — often venison and quail — comes from Texas all through the year, but there’s an annual festival featuring game till mid-March. I went to a press dinner featuring some of those specialties.

“Sunset Boulevard” is too campy story of has-been star and desperate screenwriter

“Sunset Boulevard” is too campy story of has-been star and desperate screenwriter

Glenn Close is masterful in Norma Desmond’s final mad scene. Suddenly camp becomes real drama, tragedy of the Shakespearean sort. Till then the has-been silent film star, the grande dame who flounces around in glittery gold and silver sweeping gowns and capes, is hard to take too seriously. The camp is exaggerated by butler/major-domo Max (Fred Johanson), whose dark mood and piercing eyes could have come out of a Mel Brooks Frankenstein spoof. “Goulish” is a word to describe them both, and the haunted house they live in.

“Life According to Saki” is dark, whimsical satire that aims at British upper class

“Life According to Saki” is dark, whimsical satire that aims at British upper class

Macabre and whimsical, dark and comic at the same time, a clever satiric pen pointed at self-absorbed aristocrats of the early 1900s, Katherine Rundell’s “Life According to Saki” is a delicious evening of theater.

“Jitney” follows working men struggling to survive

“Jitney” follows working men struggling to survive

You can feel the humanity pulsating and striving through the drab surroundings of the car service office in “Jitney” by the great American playwright August Wilson, who died in 2005. The protagonists, moving in an orbit around the solid Becker (a resolute, moving John Douglas Thompson), who set up the cooperative 18 years ago, are working class guys with jobs, if you want to include the numbers guy, Shealy (Harvy Blanks).